Retail Information – Apricots

PlantNet® Exclusives

PlantNet® Dwarf Apricots

Apricot - Dwarf Bulida - Fruit trees from PlantNet

Dwarf Bulida Apricot

Essential Information

  • Size: 2.5m(h) x 2.5m (w)
  • Fruit: Large fruit with golden skin – nice, sweet flavour.
  • Harvest: Late December
  • Pollination: Self-pollinating
  • Chill: Medium
Apricot - Dwarf Divinity - Fruit trees from PlantNet

Dwarf Divinity Apricot

Essential Information

  • Size: 2.5m(h) x 2.5m (w)
  • Fruit: Medium sized fruits with orange with a tinge of red to yellow skin.
  • Harvest: December to early January
  • Pollination: Self-pollinating
  • Chill: Medium to High
Apricot - Fireball - Fruit trees from PlantNet

Dwarf Fireball™ Apricot

Essential Information

Variety Solar Nugget

  • Size: 2.5m(h) x 2.5m (w)
  • Fruit: Medium sized fruit with deep orange skin – exceptional eating quality.
  • Harvest: November to December
  • Pollination: Partially self-pollinating – best paired with Spring Satin™ Plumcot.
  • Chill: Medium-Low (but not suited to subtropical and coastal climates)

Full size Fireball™ Apricot also available:

  • Size: 4m(h) x 3m(w)
Apricot - Dwarf Moorpark - Fruit tree rootstock from PlantNet

Dwarf Moorpark Apricot

Essential Information

  • Size: 2.5m(h) x 2.5m (w)
  • Fruit: Large fruits with deep orange skin.
  • Harvest: Early January
  • Pollination: Self-pollinating.
  • Chill: Medium
Apricot - Dwarf Storeys - Fruit trees from PlantNet

Dwarf Storey’s Apricot

Essential Information

  • Size: 2.5m(h) x 2.5m (w)
  • Fruit: Medium sized fruit with an orange that blushes dark orange to red.
  • Harvest: Late January
  • Pollination: Self-pollinating.
  • Chill: Medium to High

 

Apricot - Dwarf Tilton - Fruit trees from PlantNet

Dwarf Tilton Apricot

Essential Information

  • Size: 2.5m(h) x 2.5m (w)
  • Fruit: Large Fruit with bright orange skin and flesh.
  • Harvest: Early February.
  • Pollination: Self-pollinating.
  • Chill: Medium to High
Apricot - Dwarf Trevatt - Fruit trees from PlantNet

Dwarf Trevatt Apricot

Essential Information

  • Size: 2.5m(h) x 2.5m (w)
  • Fruit: Large pale orange/yellow fruits with a red tinge.
  • Harvest: December to early January.
  • Pollination: Self-pollinating.
  • Chill: Medium

Description

The PlantNet dwarf apricot range are a part of our Backyard Beauties™ that are exclusive to PlantNet® and its partner nurseries. All our dwarf apricots are suited for growing in pots and containers, in confined spaces, balconies, and courtyards or equally at home in larger acreages. Smaller apricot trees are rising in demand as fruit prices can be high and availability low, and having a less vigorous tree makes them more manageable for more of the population.

For fruit enthusiasts, we also offer our Fireball™ apricot as a full-size tree – this variety is perfect for large backyards or home orchards where a great tasting early apricot is welcome!

Area suitability for apricots relates to required chill hours, rainfall, and frost. Low chill/early varieties won’t do well in areas where late frosts will disrupt flowering and fruit set. Medium to high chill/mid to late season apricots will suit these areas better. Heavy spring rain can still impact medium/high chill apricot fruit set. Garden centres can use well ventilated, sunny, frost protected areas to avoid these problems.

It is the garden centre’s responsibility to stock varieties that suit the area it services.

Map of suitable areas for growing.

Suitability Map

This suitability map applies to all PlantNet®​ apricot varieties however garden centres should consider the chill units of their area.

Where To Order This Range:

Common FAQs

When should I prune my apricot?
  • If you live in an area which receives dominant summer rainfall, you should prune your apricot when you plant/pot it as a bare-root tree. This means that as the apricot tree exits dormancy, any root damage/shock obtained during transplanting will have less stress from the vegetation above ground.
  • If you live in an area which receives dominant winter rainfall, or heavy and/or late frosts, you should prune your new apricot tree in spring, after the risk of rain and frost has passed. This allows the apricot to heal while it is growing well, in ideal weather conditions.
Why won’t my apricots fruit?
  • Apricots can take some time to fruit – sometimes 2-3 years – and dwarf apricots are no exception. Apricots are also susceptible to adverse weather conditions during flowering and fruit set – heavy frosts or high moisture around flowers can damage flower buds/fruit or encourage diseases such as blossom blight.
Why hasn’t my apricot broken dormancy?
  • Apricots can take longer to break dormancy than other deciduous fruit trees – after planting a bare-root tree, you may not see any vegetative growth until October depending on your location. This doesn’t mean you should hold onto apricots longer as a bare-rooted tree; they should be potted up with your other stone fruits.
Why can't I grow a low chill apricot in subtropical or tropical areas?

Apricots are referred to as ‘low chill’ relative to other apricots, not other fruit trees. Low chill apricots don’t mean 100 hours – they still require 300-400 hours of chill!

Potted dwarf apricots growing for retail nurseries.

Backyard Beauties
Healthy apples- PlantNet

Stock trees for the PlantNet® apricot range.