Retail Information – Cherries

PlantNet® Exclusives

PlantNet® Dwarf Cherries

Cherry - Dwarf Lapins cherry -Dwarf Fruit trees from PlantNet

Dwarf Lapins Cherry

Essential Information

  • Size: 2.0m-2.5m(h) x 2.5m (w)
  • Fruit: Large fruit with deep red skin. These cherries are sweet and juicy with no tartness.
  • Harvest: Late December to early January.
  • Pollination: Self-pollinating
  • Chill: High

A cross of Van and Stella in 1965 and commercialized in the 80’s. They are a late season variety perfect for picking at Christmas time!

Cherry - Dwarf Morello cherry - Dwarf Fruit trees from PlantNet

Dwarf Morello Cherry

Essential Information

  • Size: 2.0m-2.5m(h) x 2.0m (w)
  • Fruit: Small to medium sized fruit with dark red skin. These cherries are popular for cooking and wine making.
  • Harvest: Early to late December to early January.
  • Pollination: Self-pollinating
  • Chill: Medium-High

A sour cherry great for cooking – the most popular sour cherry.

Cherry - Dwarf Sir Don cherry - Dwarf Fruit trees from PlantNet

Dwarf Sir Don™ Cherry

Essential Information

  • Size: 2.0m-2.5m(h) x 2.0m (w)
  • Fruit: Large fruit with dark red to black skin. These cherries are crisp and juicy with a sweet taste.
  • Harvest: Early to late December-January.
  • Pollination: Self-pollinating
  • Chill: Medium-High

This variety originated from a cross of Black Douglas and Stella. A great late season variety that boasts large fruits and a resistance to rain cracking.

Cherry - Dwarf Stella cherry - Dwarf Fruit trees from PlantNet

Dwarf Stella Cherry

Essential Information

Size: 2.0m-2.5m(h) x 2.0m (w)

  • Fruit: Large fruit with rich red skin that resists cracking. These cherries are sweet and juicy.
  • Harvest: Early to late December-January.
  • Pollination: Self-pollinating
  • Chill: Medium-High

This variety was developed in 1956 in British Columbia and first released in 1968. Stella occurred from a cross between Lambert and a self-fertile seedling from England. Stella has since been used to develop new cherry varieties like Sir Don™ and Lapins!

Description

The PlantNet dwarf cherry range are a part of our Cherry Celebrations® that are exclusive to PlantNet® and its partner nurseries. All our dwarf cherries are suited for growing in pots and containers, in confined spaces, balconies, and courtyards or equally at home in larger acreages. Smaller cherry trees are rising in demand as fruit prices can be high and availability low, and having a less vigorous tree makes them more manageable for more of the population.

Area suitability for cherries relates to required chill hours, rainfall, and frost. Heavy spring rain and frost can impact cherry fruit set. Garden centres can use well ventilated, sunny, frost protected areas to avoid these problems.

It is the garden centre’s responsibility to stock varieties that suit the area it services. In areas outside our recommended cherry growing areas, we suggest garden centre’s provide local information about best practices to grow cherries successfully.

fruit tree growing suitable map Australia

Suitability Map

Cherries are best grown in their traditional growing regions throughout Australia. Cherries should be kept protected while flowering until the risk of frost passes. The PlantNet® cherry varieties require over 400 chill hours.

Where To Order This Range:

Common FAQs

When should I prune my cherry?

Cherries should be pruned in late winter when dormant. Home gardeners should focus on dead or diseased wood, then shape. The Cherry Celebrations® range don’t require much pruning each year. Cherries fruit on 1 year old + wood, so avoid pruning all of last season’s growth.

Why won’t my cherries fruit?

Depending on the variety, you may not get fruit for more than 2 years. In some circumstances, cherries can take 7 years to fruit! Home gardeners should also consider the health of their tree, and the environmental conditions during spring which could have impacted pollination.

Why hasn’t my cherry broken dormancy?

Compared to other stone fruit such as peaches and nectarines, cherries generally have higher chill requirements. In a warmer winter, cherries may remain dormant for longer until they receive the required chill hours. Extended dormancy can also occur in climatic areas where cherries aren’t suitable.

We recommend that garden centres take note of the success of cherry trees in their local area and only stock them if suitable.

Backyard Beauties